C'est La Vie
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About: 
Hello, my name is Emma.
I'm 19, and I love traveling and theatre and horses and libraries.

"Curiouser and curiouser."

thedemonica:

it’s back in time for christmas

the incest coffee commercial 

(via poco-loki)

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50 Years of Time and Space by Richard Swarbick

(Source: hawkerly, via lazoey)

cambridge university students were asked on campus why they needed feminism. here are 60 answers. click the link for over about 600 more.

(Source: awkwardsituationist, via mockingfire)

50,809 plays

(Source: indiemusicfreak, via awesome-oppossum)

(Source: kateoplis, via clairepe-diem)

allantruong:

this is my favorite post

(via ellie-nor)

Words.: I feel bad that I don’t like feminism as much as I should.Like, I...

sam-lyons:

meliss-adventures:

averageanduninteresting:

I feel bad that I don’t like feminism as much as I should.

Like, I like having my door opened for me, or being more “girly” or shaving my legs and wearing makeup, having the date being paid for, or not being able to be hit by a man (in a way) and I do depend on a guy to protect me when I’m…

Feminism seems to get a bad rap. But it shouldn’t! 

Because the whole point is to embrace all forms of womanhood: be they ultra-feminine, and lipstick-lovin, and smooth-legged, or closer aligned to what society has construed as “masculine”. A lot of feminists who are in the spotlight have demonstrated a more extreme side of the cause, and extremes are the most naturally debated, highlighted, noticed; unfortunately, that it makes people shy away from the platform. So when you’ve only been exposed to this extreme sort of feminism, it seems like that’s the only option, and it seems to invalidate your lifestyle, which is closer to the normative construct of your gender. And that’s okay! Because the point is that all of our lifestyles, no matter where they fall on the spectrum, are acceptable, because we are all humans. 

We did this interesting reading of Orner in my E&D class that argued that across time, in every culture, women have been subjugated. And all the ladies in the class bristled at first, because here we were, our gender numbering greater than the men in the class, daughters of strong mothers, carriers of legends. And it seemed like her argument was pretty broad, and pretty unformed. But the more we read it, and considered the nuances of what she said, it’s hard not to see things her way. And though it’s much more subtle in our (thankfully progressive/progressing Western) civilization, it remains an issue in many parts of the world. And that’s where the key idea of feminism, at least in my view, comes into play. 

The idea is not to destroy domesticity, to renounce our human children and dance off  like the bacchae into the wild. The idea is to recognize the existence of a domestic sphere, and work to make its walls more permeable. The idea is to expand women’s place in the world so that she can choose how she exists in it. There’s nothing wrong with desiring domesticity. But there is a problem in this being the only option available to women. She should not be reduced to her biological creative process- she should be free to express her creativity externally if she so desires, to contribute to civilization in more than a singularly reproductive way. The point is to expand the world to include women on an equal rank in society, instead of limiting them and shaming them and categorizing their options. 

So I don’t think the point of feminism is to renounce all dresses, and to hate men, and to refuse all help. Rather, it’s about recognizing women’s agency in the world. Recognizing that if we want, we can exist happily with a significant other, that we can appreciate the nice treatment of a nice gesture, a nice dinner, having the door held open for us. That we can need connection with another human, that we can desire comfort, and protection, and security, because these are natural, valid, human emotions. That we can love our families and love our marriage. But that we can also exist happily independent of this if we so choose, that our existence is not entirely dependent on what men can do for us. That we can hold the door open for somebody else, and gender doesn’t really come into play, and it doesn’t threaten anybody, and the world keeps on turning. It’s more about opening the forum to discussion, expanding our definitions of womanhood, and promoting greater acceptance. It makes me a little bummed that so many people are turned off by the idea of feminism because they feel that it attacks their lifestyle, because that’s the exact opposite of what it’s supposed to do. It shouldn’t make women who have freely chosen their life path, who are comfortable with their choices feel guilty. I dunno, man. Maybe I’m just the half-baked product of a first-semester liberal arts education but I think this is a pretty important distinction to make. 

This is one of the best things I’ve ever read

(via lieutenant-dad)

tigtragers:

THE EVOLUTION OF POP

"Do I listen to pop music because I’m miserable or am I miserable because I listen to pop music?" - John Cusack

A compilation of 160 chart-topping pop songs, beginning in 1940 and ending 73 years later. 
All songs were at the top of the Billboard 100 for at least two weeks. It’s the ultimate throwback.

Listen

(via agernt)

and-down-we-go:

My Mom just accidentally prematurely sent an email to an accounting firm… It was supposed to say ‘I am afraid that we will have to postpone our meeting”

but she hit send when all it said was

Hi Jeffrey,
      I am afraid

(via nevertrustaduck)

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